Final paper for Module 3

3 06 2010

Scavenger Hunt: Pick three hospitals – one in state and two out of state. Go to their website and find information on two topics:
Birth Certificates:
Find an answer to the following questions:

What do you do if the baby is not named before leaving the hospital?

How would you obtain a certified copy of a Birth Certificate?

Who needs to establish paternity and what form do they need to sign?

Wesley Medical Center in Kansas allows for unmarried parents to have both names documented on the birth certificate if both parties will sign a paternity form and have the form notarized; the hospital will then send the completed document to the state to register the birth.  I had to phone the hospital to gain clarification on their policy regarding leaving the hospital without naming the newborn.  As I experienced in conversations with other hospitals, there was a strong urging against choosing to not name the baby before discharge, however, as Deborah, a nurse in the maternity ward, extension 7990, explained to me, it is permitted.  I would be allowed only five days to get to know my baby before having to name it, per state law, and I would have to handle this issue through the state’s Public Health and Human Services Department.  Deborah went on to say I would receive a documentation of birth from their hospital that would indicate the sex and pertinent birth information, and the name would be recorded as NFN, for No First Name, followed by my last name (Wesley MC).

The Portsmouth United States Naval Hospital in Virginia explains that paternity forms are available at the admission’s desk, and explains under state law and their policy, the husband is the father of the baby, even if he is not the biological father.  If the parents are not married, both parents will need to sign a paternity document in front of a notary and the hospital will file the documents on their behalf and the father must bring two proofs of identification, one of which must include a photo (USNavy).  This same hospital requires that the baby’s name be completed on the proof of birth documents prior to being released from the hospital and held steadfast to this policy even when I called to discuss the issue.  It was explained that this policy is a military policy, enabling the government to register the newborn dependant into their DEERS database and they are not subject to local or state laws that may differ.  I was directed to contact the Virginia Department of Vital Statistics for a certified copy of the birth certificate (USNavy).

The subject of not naming a baby prior to leaving the hospital seems to be a sore spot with the medical professionals I spoke with, specifically at Lee Memorial Hospitals in Florida.  Their website does not address the issue, thus I chose to call the Childbirth Information and Education hotline.  Kelly explained that there would need to be a name to put on the birth certificate, but after pressed for a firm answer as to whether or not a patient could leave the hospital without naming the baby, she transferred me to Tonya.  Tonya repeatedly asked me “Why would you not want to name your baby?” to which I finally said, “I just haven’t picked a name yet.”  Her answer was rather snide, saying “You’ve had nine months.”  I continued to press for the hospital’s policy on the matter and I was transferred to another lady, Ruth.  Ruth, too, seemed aghast that I would not have a name for my possible newborn and held fast to the policy of the hospital being that I could not leave without naming my child.  I had my doubts about this statement, so I asked her if I could get her direct extension and title to give to my insurance company if they refused to pay for my additional length of time in the hospital that it would take me to decide on the most suitable name for my baby.  Ruth then transferred me to Candy.  Candy is a nurse who works in the Obstetrics department, and her extension is 3362.  Candy explained that while they will strongly encourage patients to have their names selected before arriving and certainly before discharge, it isn’t mandatory.  If I, this presumed mother to be, wished to not name my baby before dismissal, the baby would be registered with the state as Baby Girl (or Boy) with my last name.  To later register the name, which I would have thirty days to do without filing for an extension, I would have to file legal forms with the county Vital Statistics department and there would be fees for selecting this option.  As for the paternity issue, if I am married, whether or not my husband is the father, he will be documented as the father of the baby.  If I have been divorced or single for more than 300 days, I will need to have the father of the child be present for the birth, submit identification to the appropriate staff and he will need to sign a legal document in front of the hospital’s notary to indicate that he is the father of the baby (Lee Memorial).

Transcription Services:

Find 3 different forms of transcription services available to a medical provider. Provide a brief overview of each service. Based on your research, what do you think is a better option for a medical provider in regards to transcription services?

Medical transcription formats vary from the use of a recording device later transcribed from verbal recording to written text to short-hand recording done in real time while the conversation is taking place which is later reformatted to long-hand (Tatum).  Another viable method is the use of speech-recognition software to record the information and translate it to recorded text (Medical Transcription Software).

The Dictaphone or similar recording device is the most commonly used transcription format (Tatum).  This device was invented in the early 1900s and records spoken word to a tape, which can later be played back for a transcriptionist or scribe, to translate the verbal message into written text (Recording History).  The Dictaphone I have has a foot pedal which can be used to rewind, play, and pause the cassette and aside from the film of the tape cassette breaking from repeated use; it is a very user friendly device.  I’ve not used a digital recorder, but there are now tapeless recorders that store data to a memory stick that is fairly indestructible and can hold a larger amount of data (Philips).

Real-time transcription is typically done in court rooms, when the court reporter must document the events at a quick pace, as they cannot be replayed.  This method can record 200 words a minute and is done now often with software known as Computer Aided Transcription (Kessel).  The traditional method would have a stenographer use a specialty typewriter to enter the conversation in a writing method known as short-hand, or writing on a notepad in short-hand, which would later be altered into long-hand or standard wording (Kessel).  The standard is a rate of 50-120 words per minute with short-hand (City and Guilds).  I would personally think that there is an undesirable error rate with this method as it is not able to be rewound to verify that the data scribed was recorded accurately.

My experience with speech-recognition software is through the use of a program called Dragon Speak, about ten years ago.  I’ll first acknowledge that technology has progressed dramatically over that decade and it is highly probable that the software has as well, however, when I had to use this to document my work, it was highly faulty.  The basics of this program and most any like it, the user will have to complete a series of speech sets with the software so that it can begin to recognize the vocal patterns and nuances of that specific user’s voice.  This is done by speaking into a microphone to repeat words, sentences and paragraphs selected by the software.  Afterwards, the software can be used to translate spoken word it hears to written text on an electronic document (Grabianowski).  Most of these programs boast at least an 85% accuracy rate, but in the medical realm where anything less than 100% is not good enough, I do not believe this would be the best option for transcribing.

I personally would prefer the method of recorded transcription through the use of a Dictaphone or digital recorder as this is the only method that allows the scribe to re-check their work.  With various dialects, speech defects and accents, not to mention unfamiliar words or homonyms used in conversation, a transcriptionist needs to be able to verify that what they have documented is accurate, especially in the medical field.

Work Cited

Audio Transcription, Shorthand Speed, Typewriting. London: City and Guilds of London Institute, 2003. City and Guilds. Web. 26 May 2010. <www.cityandguilds.cz/files/docs/syllabuses/typewriting.8972.pdf>.

“Birth Certificate: How Can I Request a Copy of My Child’s Birth Certificate?” Edwards Hospital. Web. 24 May 2010. <http://www.edward.org/body.cfm?xyzpdqabc=0&id=96&action=detail&ref=22&gt;.

Grabianowski, Ed. “How Speech Recognition Works.” Howstuffworks. Web. 26 May 2010. <http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/high-tech-gadgets/speech-recognition.htm&gt;.

Kessel, John. “Real Time Transcription.” EzineArticles. 5 Apr. 2008. Web. 26 May 2010. <http://ezinearticles.com/?Real-Time-Transcription&id=1090970&gt;.

Lee Memorial Health System. Web. 24 May 2010. <http://www.leememorial.org/about/phonelist.asp&gt;.

“InfraWare Speech Recognition Technology Improves Productivity.” Medical Transcription Software. Web. 25 May 2010. <http://www.infraware.com/speech_recognition.php&gt;.

Miami Valley Hospital. Web. 24 May 2010. <http://www.miamivalleyhospital.org/mvhdefault.aspx&gt;.

“Digital Dictation.” Philips Speech Processing. Web. 26 May 2010. <http://www.dictation.philips.com/index.php?id=51&gt;.

“Birth Certificate Service.” St.Joseph’s-Baptist Healthcare. Web. 25 May 2010. <http://www.sjbhealth.org/body_womens.cfm?id=1306&gt;.

Tatum, Malcolm. “What Are the Different Types of Medical Transcription Work?” WiseGEEK. Web. 25 May 2010. <http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-different-types-of-medical-transcription-work.htm&gt;.

“History of the Office Dictation Machine.” The History of Sound Recording Technology. Web. 26 May 2010. <http://www.recording-history.org/HTML/dicta_tech1.php&gt;.

“San Jacinto Methodist Hospital.” The Methodist Hospital System. Web. 24 May 2010. <http://www.methodisthealth.com/sjmh.cfm?id=36853#birthcert&gt;.

“Portsmouth Naval Hospital.” USNavy Medicine Support Command. Web. 24 May 2010. <http://www.med.navy.mil/sites/nmcp/Pages/default.aspx&gt;.

“Wesley Medical Center – Pregnancy and Preparation for Childbirth.” Wesley Medical Center – Home Page. Web. 24 May 2010. <http://www.wesleymc.com/CustomPage.asp?PageName=Pregnancy%20and%20Preparation%20for%20Childbirth&gt;.

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8 responses

3 06 2010
Pearl

They probably worry about illegals down there in Florida, maybe thats why they make them name the baby.

4 06 2010
Lou

Mybe if you’d told them you were a student they wouldn’t have been so bitchy but what do you expect when your trying to tell them you cant figure out your kids name after 9 months

4 06 2010
Mx

Medical Transcription Services have come a long way from the early days of typewriters and carbon copies, but the way they are billed is often a mystery. So how do you know if you’re getting the best deal? Clearly, accuracy is critical. But with myriad ways medical transcription services companies compute their charges, it’s important to understand HOW to get an “apples to apples” comparison between potential service providers.

20 06 2010
Qibb

This is not near as good as most of your writing

15 07 2010
protogere

LoL Thanks, it was restricted to a specific topic that wasn’t exactly my choosing.

19 08 2010
Fricke

Not as good as some of your others but still I like your thoughts

29 10 2010
ks

I will place this page in my stumble upons….

6 02 2011
dluce3

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